Hi Brian! I enjoy reading your posts and use as much info as I possibly can. I build and sell storage sheds and cabins. The problem I have is that there are no top bloggers in my market or wikipedia articles with deadlinks that have to do with my market. 95% of my traffic and sales are generated via Facebook paid advertising. Would love to get more organic traffic and would be interested in your thoughts concerning this.
You have also mentioned Quuu for article sharing and driving traffic. I have been using Quuu for quite sometime now and I don’t think they’re worth it. While the content does get shared a lot, there are hardly any clicks to the site. Even the clicks that are there, average time is like 0.02 seconds compared to more than 2 minutes for other sources of traffic on my website. I have heard a few guys having a similar experience with Quuu and so, I thought should let you know.
In a very crowded, noisy space – entrepreneurs and small business owners with a ton of “experts and influencers.” How do I get “above the noise?” I have built up a great brand and, I think, some great content based on a boatload of practical, real-life experience. I also have some products and services that I’m trying to sell, but I remain, “all dressed up, with no place to go.” Thoughts?

In short, press request alerts are requests for sources of information from journalists. Let's say you're a journalist putting together an article on wearable technology for The Guardian. Perhaps you need a quote from an industry expert or some products that you can feature within your article? Well, all you need to do is send out a request to a press service and you can wait for someone to get back to you.

We’ll lead with the big one: making a text ad is really, really easy. In the amount of time it takes to launch one banner ad, you can probably A/B test ten different text ads. Small companies without easy access to a graphic designer can obviously benefit from this. Keep in mind that tiny changes in a message can have enormous impacts – take ComScore, for example. Small tweaks to content placement wound up boosting their conversions by 63%.


Travel back to May 2016 with me, when Paid Search practitioners across the globe went through the tedious migration from standard text ads to Google’s Expanded Text Ads. In the end, this time-consuming transition was well worth it. Advertisers reported 50% more space for ad copy and the new, mobile-friendly ad format reportedly drove a 20% increase in CTRs across the board.
Google is currently been inundated with reconsideration requests from webmasters all over the world. On public holidays the Search Quality teams do not look at reconsideration requests. See below analysis. From my experience it can take anywhere from 15-30+ days for Google to respond to reconsideration requests; during peak periods it can even take longer.
Great article as always. My wife is about to start a business about teaching (mainly) Mums how to film and edit little movies of their loved ones for posterity (www.lovethelittlethings.com launching soon). We have always struggled with thinking of and targeting relevant keywords because keywords like ‘videography’ and ‘family movies’ don’t really some up what she is about. Your article ties in with other learnings we have come across where we obviously need to reach out to right people and get them to share to get her product out there because purely focusing on keywords I don’t think will get us anywhere.
We wanted to talk about in-text advertising because there is often confusion about our SkimWords technology and whether or not it is comparable to the products offered by companies like Vibrant and Amobee. The first difference is that SkimWords does not generate a display ad when you hover. We do offer a product flyover option which brings up a product image and shopping link when you hover over certain keywords, but these are product suggestions, not ads. The second difference is that in-text ads are exclusively CPC, while Skimwords is not.
When someone visits a website, their computer or other web-connected device communicates with the website's server. Each page on the web is made up of dozens of distinct files. The site's server transmits each file to user browsers where they are assembled and formed into a cumulative piece with graphics and text. Every file sent represents a single “hit”, so a single page viewing can result in numerous hits.
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